TsukuBlog

A Local Perspective on Life in Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.

More Traditional Functions of Seasonal Bon-Fires: Roasting Potatoes and Toasting Buns

By Avi Landau

More than once, I have written about the nuisance created by farmers (and others) burning their agricultural waste or household garbage, thereby smoking up what would otherwise be the delicious air of the countryside. It has been pointed out to me that traditionally, these bon-fires were a way of easily getting rid of the useless by-products of the farmers labors, and also of restoring minerals to the overworked soil.

Looking further into the history of this custom, I have concluded that there is another reason for its having arisen and for its survival (in diminished scale) to the present day. Bon-fires were a way of KEEPING WARM in a country in which houses were unheated (except for the dug-out areas beneath the kotatsu table where legs and laps were warmed). Small bon-fires (TAKIBI — 焚火) were a ubiquitous feature of roadsides, fields and gardens. On cold days people would gather round for a chat and maybe even get some sweet potatoes roasting in the fallen leaves and twigs which were used as fuel.

I have found an amusing woodblock print showing travellers enjoying the warmth of such a fire. It is by Utagawa Hiroshige and can be found at the the Prefectural Art Museum in Hagi, Yamaguchi. The man in the loincloth warming his posterior reminds me of an evocative haiku by Nomura Kishu (野村喜舟, 1886-1983) which reads:

尻あぶる人山を見る焚火かな
shiri aburu hito yama o miru takibi ka na  

Looking at the mountains, as he warms his buns-  a man by the bon-fire
(my translation)

The more I think about it now, the more sense it makes. Instead of getting all upset about my old neighbor smoking up the air and besotting my hanging laundry, I will get out of my freezing house, bearing a gift of sweet potatoes, and join him, snug and warm, staring, as if hypnotized, into the flames.

I have written more on the bon-fires of Japan`s countryside here:

http://blog.alientimes.org/2010/11/tsukubas-smokey-autumn-air-the-gomi-moshi-problem-2



2 Comments

  • Mamoru Shimizu says:

    “Kakine no Kakineno Magarikado Takibida Takibida Ochiba daki” Japanese children song “Over the corner over the corner there is bone-fire of fallen leaves”
    As you know one of Japanese ladies favorites has been roasted sweet potatos,used be prepared by Bone-fires. Now there are so many species used for this purpose, and expensive one sold in Ginza area cost more than thousands Yen par piece,so men could not afford, never tasted. YAKEIMO-CEE :oops:

    It is pity to find rice-straws are mostly burnt in the field which has been used for many ways, tatami base,feed,umbrella,shoes etc,one can make a book to describe about this. :razz:

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